Times Past


We’ve learned some new information about this previously published photo of the Gainesville High School Glee Club, which is mentioned in a 1928 item shared in this week’s Times Past. We now know that the photo was taken to advertise the club’s upcoming performance of “Love Pirates of Hawaii.” The group posed beside Gainesville’s fourth school building, which was built in 1917 on the site near today’s Gainesville post office and was later demolish after being declared unsafe. Only three glee club members’ identities are known: Hattie Clark (Sandford) is on the far right, and her brother, Wolf Clark, is standing near the center of the group in the dark sweater. The student labeled “Virgil” is Virgil Robinson, father of Carla Robinson Lane and her brother, the late Russ Robinson. The photo was recently shared with us by Matt Lyons of Springfield, grandson of Hattie Clark Sandford.
Ozark County Times Feb. 20, 1914  Mrs. Newt Martin of Locust, who we reported last week as improving, died Thursday night of last week. Interment was made in the Pontiac Cemetery Saturday.    Feb. 22, 1918  Dora – Austin Hightower is putting a roof on the skylight blacksmith shop this week.  E. C....

Passengers chat as they cross the North Fork of the White River at Tecumseh on the Hodo Ferry in this 1930s photo from the Ozark County Historium’s collection. The late Dorothy Gardner had written on the back of the photo that the passengers included the Gradie Sanders family. The “neighborhood of Hodo Ferry” is mentioned in a Jan. 7, 1913, item in this week’s Times Past as having been hit by smallpox.
Ozark County Times Jan. 7, 1913 County court was in session here Monday and Tuesday making settlement with the Collector and, with the county physician, acted as a County Board of Health. They formulated quarantine regulations against smallpox, and the sheriff is instructed to rigidly enforce these...

When Micheal Mahan shared this 1960s photo of the Bakersfield Cafe on the Bakersfield Missouri Historical Society’s Facebook page, many viewers shared their memories of the landmark gathering place. Judy Eastman Ball identified the people in the photo from the names written on the back of the original photo owned by her cousin, Bonnie Carlile. From left:. Margie Williamson, Floyd Hathcock and Freda Sexton. Behind the counter: Ozella Vaughan, Maxine Vaughan, Violet Young, Flora Simpson Shrable and Patsy Williams.. Thanks to Mahan and Ball for permission to reprint the photo and names here.
Ozark County Times Feb. 1, 1918 Another big offensive move was started Sunday night against the Germans when John. C. Harlin, Chairman of Ozark County W. S. S. Committee fired the first gun by making a speech ... appealing to the citizens to put their money in the fight for liberty. ...  Before the...

A Jan. 25, 1918, item in this week’s Times Past reports that Bakersfield residents gathered to go coasting (sledding) on the “schoolhouse hill.” The sledding site was the former location of this stately Bakersfield school building, which is described in an unidentified newspaper clipping as “the pride of the community ... in the early 1900s.” The building, which housed the first high school classes to be held in Bakersfield in 1914, burned just after the new year began in 1915. According to Times publisher Ruby Robins’ history of the school published in the Aug. 31, 1983, edition of the Times, a few months after the wooden building burned, a concrete schoolhouse was constructed. That building, which opened in 1915, was destroyed by a tornado in June 1928 and was replaced by the school that was eventually demolished before the construction last year of Bakersfield’s current school building.
Ozark County Times Jan. 25, 1918 The sad intelligence was reported here a few days ago that Martin Alsup, son of H. F. Alsup of South Fork, had died suddenly of strangulation while at the hospital at Ft. Sill, Okla., where he and his father had been called to be present when an operation for an...

This photo of the store at Locust, from the collection of the late Stella Martin Luna, is believed to have been taken shortly after the Locust post office opened in the store in 1911. According to “A History of Ozark County, 1841-1991,” Benjamin Breeding, right, was the only postmaster at Locust until it “closed out to Gainesville” in 1940. Also pictured, from left: Raymond McGinnis, Lonnie McGinnis, Margaret Webster Breeding, Stella Upton Martin, Clifford Webb and Bertha Webb holding Clifford’s brother.
Ozark County Times Jan. 18, 1918 This region has been experiencing the past week the most severe winter weather it has had in more than 30 years. On Thursday of last week it commenced snowing, on Friday the ground was covered to a depth of 12 or 14 inches and since then 6 inches has been added,...

We don’t know what occasion brought about this luncheon shared on the north-side lawn of the courthouse, but it may have been part of the open-house celebration marking the opening of the new Ozark County Times office after the original building burned on Feb. 14, 1963. We know the identity of only one person in the photo: Ruby Robins, who owned and operated the Ozark County Times with her husband, Fred Robins, is seated third from right. We speculate that the luncheon may have honored the Times’ correspondents and their families. The undated photo is part of the Ruby Robins collection of photos and memorabilia at the Ozark County Historium.
Ozark County Times Jan. 11, 1907 The County Court at its last session appointed Geo. W. Boone, W. T. Harlin and Marion Haskins as a committee to select a site and erect thereon a good substantial stone jail for Ozark county. The committee is authorized to sell the old jail and lot and with the...

This photo of the dam and powerhouse at Althea Spring is reprinted from “A History of Ozark County, 1841-1991,” which is available on DVD from the Ozark County Historium. A story by the late Dale Morrison accompanies the photo in the book, explaining that the area around the spring, now a Missouri Department of Conservation access point on the North Fork of the White River, was purchased by Karl W. Schmidt, owner of Builders Steel Co. of Kansas City, on May 9, 1958. Schmidt built a home, office, machine shop and caretaker’s home as well as the dam across the spring branch and a generator and powerhouse, which provided power for the Schmidt home. On Aug. 24, 1977, David Wagner drove Karl and his wife, Willa, to Springfield for doctors’ appointments. As they were returning home, all three were killed in a single-vehicle crash near Seymour. In 1980, MDC purchased the spring and surrounding property for $200,000.
Ozark County Times Jan. 7, 1916 Hammond – H. T. Owens and Bob Jones drove into Pond Fork which had a four-foot rise. The swift water carried the team and buggy some 50 yards below the ford before they could land. The buggy was completely submerged but remained upright, and the boys refused to leave...

We can’t be sure this photo was taken after the wolf hunt reported (below) in the Jan. 2, 1941, edition of the Times, but it seems likely, given that the late Raymond Luna, second from right, is pictured with four other men, probably Everett Johnson, Jud Hayes, Ode Beasley and Boyd Hickey. Except for Luna, we don’t know which name goes with which man. If you can help identify them, please contact Sue Ann Jones at 417-989-1040 or sueann@ozarkcountytimes.com.
Correction: We’ve been informed that the woman named as Mary Mefford in last week’s 1963 photo of Ozark County Times correspondents should have been identified as Delphia Mefford, correspondent for Price Place (Arkansas).   Ozark County News Dec. 30, 1904 Joda Wilson, Constable of Barren Fork...

This photo of the Ozark County Times correspondents, dated Sept. 28, 1963, was recently shared with the Ozark County Historium by occasional Times correspondent Theta Nokes, whose mother, Lilliam Clayton, is one of the correspondents pictured. These names are written on a piece of paper attached to the photo: Front row, from left: Edith Reynolds, Centerpoint; Alzona Miller, Sandridge; Rose Ranck, Dawt; Pearlie Poe, Charity; Golda Walker, Grabeel; Hazel Effia Hodges, Toledo; Bertha Watson, Lilly Ridge; Rose Snell, Pine View and Willhoit; Mary Mefford, Price Place and Alma Garrison, Guber. Back row: Pansy Rozell, Ocie; Roy Pare, Romance; Brooksie McGinnis, Lutie and Theodosia; Lilliam Clayton, Wasola; Opal Hooper, Gamaliel, Arkansas; Bessie Freeman, Crossroads; Edythe Farmer, Hi-Romance; Edith Jones, Clark; Bessie Feemster, Noble; Ila Young, Lone Pilgrim; Jenice Williamson, Nottinghill; Dohna Mahan, Caney; Blanche Honeycutt, Idumea; Audy Wallace, Longrun; Verna Gardner, Souder; and J. W. Findley, Hammond, who wrote the “Weatherman Bill” column.
Ozark County News Dec. 21, 1899 Rev. A. L. Simmons, pastor of the M. E. Church of this place, returned Monday after holding a three-week revival meeting at the Howard Ridge Church. He reports a good interest in the meeting resulting in 15 additions to the church, six by letter and nine on probation...

This photo, from the collection of Judy Ford Lyons, shows Ozark County’s second jail, built in the 1870s in Gainesville and most likely the one mentioned in the 1897 report of a prisoner’s attempted escaped in this week’s Times Past. A History of Ozark County, 1841-1991 says the two-story jail, about 12’ x 18’, was attached to the sheriff’s dwelling with removable steps leading to a second-story doorway. The lower jail level could be entered from the long porch fronting the sheriff’s dwelling. The jail and dwelling were “located in the field across Lick Creek, northeasterly from the town square, where Highway 160 bridge crosses the creek,” according to the history book. In its Dec. 28, 1905, edition, the Ozark County Republican expressed its opinion that “the jail ... is little better than a hog pen, ...disgraceful to the county.” A later newspaper story said the old jail “is immediately below a livery stable and the drainage from the stable naturally makes the jail a very unsanitary place to confine persons.” In its Jan. 11, 1907, edition, the Ozark County Times reported that the county court had appointed a committee to select a site and erect “a good substantial stone jail for Ozark County.” That jail is believed to stand today near Harlin Drive and Third Street and is owned by Wayne and Doris Sayles.
Ozark County News Dec. 9, 1897 James Guilliams, who is in jail on a charge of burglary, came near causing a conflagration in town last Thursday by trying to burn his way to freedom. The jail is made of logs, and the walls are double.  Last Thursday, while passing through the alley, Hugh Layton...

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Ozark County Times

504 Third Steet
PO Box 188
Gainesville, MO 65655

Phone: (417) 679-4641
Fax: (417) 679-3423

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